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The immunomodulatory potential of natural compounds in tumor-bearing mice and humans. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2019;59(6):992-1007

Date

02/24/2019

Pubmed ID

30795687

Pubmed Central ID

PMC6508979

DOI

10.1080/10408398.2018.1537237

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85065563063   2 Citations

Abstract

Cancer is considered a fetal disease caused by uncontrolled proliferation and progression of abnormal cells. The most efficient cancer therapies suppress tumor growth, prevent progression and metastasis, and are minimally toxic to normal cells. Natural compounds have shown a variety of chemo-protective effects alone or in combination with standard cancer therapies. Along with better understanding of the dynamic interactions between our immune system and cancer development, nutritional immunology-the use of natural compounds as immunomodulators in cancer patients-has begun to emerge. Cancer cells evolve strategies that target many aspects of the immune system to escape or even edit immune surveillance. Therefore, the immunesuppressive tumor microenvironment is a major obstacle in the development of cancer therapies. Because interaction between the tumor microenvironment and the immune system is a complex topic, this review focuses mainly on human clinical trials and animal studies, and it highlights specific immune cells and their cytokines that have been modulated by natural compounds, including carotenoids, curcumin, resveratrol, EGCG, and β-glucans. These natural compounds have shown promising immune-modulating effects, such as inhibiting myeloid-derived suppressor cells and enhancing natural killer and cytolytic T cells, in tumor-bearing animal models, but their efficacy in cancer patients remains to be determined.

Author List

Pan P, Huang YW, Oshima K, Yearsley M, Zhang J, Arnold M, Yu J, Wang LS

Authors

Yi-Wen Huang PhD Assistant Professor in the Obstetrics and Gynecology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Li-Shu Wang PhD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Animals
Carotenoids
Catechin
Curcumin
Humans
Immune System
Immunologic Factors
Killer Cells, Natural
Mice
Neoplasms
T-Lymphocytes
Tretinoin
Tumor Microenvironment
beta-Glucans
jenkins-FCD Prod-400 0f9a74600e4e79798f8fa6f545ea115f3dd948b2