Medical College of Wisconsin
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Ethnic disparities in stroke recognition in individuals with prior stroke. Public Health Rep 2008 Jul-Aug;123(4):514-22 PMID: 18763414 PMCID: PMC2430648

Pubmed ID

18763414

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Studies of stroke awareness suggest that knowledge of early warning signs of stroke is low in high-risk groups. However, little is known about stroke knowledge among individuals with a history of prior stroke who are at significant risk for recurrent stroke.

METHODS: Data from 2,970 adults with a history of prior stroke from the 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were examined. Recognition of the five warning signs of stroke and appropriate action to call 911 was compared across three racial/ethnic groups: non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic/other. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to: (1) determine the association between race/ethnicity and recognition of multiple stroke signs and appropriate first action and (2) identify independent correlates of recognition of multiple stroke signs and taking appropriate action to seek treatment among individuals with prior stroke.

RESULTS: Recognition of all five signs of stroke and taking appropriate action to call 911 was lowest among the non-Hispanic black group (22.3%) and Hispanic/other group (16.7%). In multivariate models, Hispanic/other (odds ratio [OR] 0.42 [0.25, 0.71]), age 50-64 (OR 0.64 [0.43, 0.97]), age > or =65 (OR 0.36 [0.23, 0.55]), and >high school education (OR 1.79 [1.22, 2.63]) emerged as independent correlates of recognition of all five signs of stroke and first action to call 911.

CONCLUSIONS: Less than 35% of people with prior stroke can distinguish the complex symptom profile of a stroke and take appropriate action to call 911. Targeted educational activities that are sensitive to differences in race/ethnicity age, and education levels are needed for individuals with prior stroke.

Author List

Ellis C, Egede LE

Author

Leonard E. Egede MD Center Director, Chief, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-53049099673   14 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Continental Population Groups
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Stroke
United States
jenkins-FCD Prod-353 9ccd8489072cb19f5b9f808bb23ed672c582f41e