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Association between number of physician visits and influenza vaccination coverage among diabetic adults with access to care. Diabetes Care 2003 Sep;26(9):2562-7 PMID: 12941719

Pubmed ID

12941719

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The proportion of diabetic adults that receives the influenza vaccine is less than ideal. This study determined the relationship between the number of physician visits in the previous 12 months and the likelihood of influenza vaccination among diabetic adults with access to care.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data on 1807 diabetic adults with access to care in the 1999 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were analyzed. Prevalence of influenza vaccination was determined by number of physician visits. Logistic regression was used to determine the independent association between number of physician visits and influenza vaccination coverage, controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, income, employment census region, and comorbidity. STATA was used for analyses to account for the complex sampling design of NHIS.

RESULTS: Overall, 56% of subjects received the influenza vaccine. Proportions vaccinated by number of physician visits were as follows: 35% (no visit), 47% (1-3 visits), 58% (4-9 visits), and 61% (>or=10 visits). Compared with people with no physician visit, people with 4-9 visits (odds ratio [OR] 2.61) and >or=10 visits (2.96) were significantly more likely to be vaccinated. However, after controlling for covariates, only people with >or=10 visits (2.34) were significantly more likely to be vaccinated.

CONCLUSIONS: In this nationally representative sample, repeated physician visits by diabetic adults with access to care were associated with only modest increases in influenza vaccination coverage. In adjusted analysis, odds of influenza vaccination were not significantly associated with number of physician visits, except in people with >or=10 visits.

Author List

Egede LE

Author

Leonard E. Egede MD Center Director, Chief, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-0042324114   19 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
Aged
Comorbidity
Continental Population Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus
Female
Humans
Influenza Vaccines
Interviews as Topic
Male
Office Visits
Physicians
Socioeconomic Factors
South Carolina
Vaccination
jenkins-FCD Prod-353 9ccd8489072cb19f5b9f808bb23ed672c582f41e