Medical College of Wisconsin
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Beliefs and attitudes of African Americans with type 2 diabetes toward depression. Diabetes Educ 2002 Mar-Apr;28(2):258-68 PMID: 11924303

Pubmed ID

11924303

Abstract

PURPOSE: This qualitative study was conducted with African Americans with type 2 diabetes to explore beliefs and attitudes about depression.

METHODS: Twenty-five adults participated in 4 focus groups. The sessions were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. The Health Belief Model was used as a theoretical framework for the design and analysis of the focus group data.

RESULTS: Five themes pertinent to depression management emerged: (1) There were misconceptions about the etiology of depression and individual vulnerability to depression. (2) Depression was perceived as severe. (3) Treatment was perceived as beneficial. (4) Stigma was a significant barrier to seeking treatment. (5) Cues to action did not appear to change beliefs.

CONCLUSIONS: Despite awareness about the severity of depression and benefits of treatment, several barriers and erroneous beliefs may interfere with the ability of African Americans with type 2 diabetes to seek and adhere to treatment for depression.

Author List

Egede LE

Author

Leonard E. Egede MD Center Director, Chief, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-0036516254   26 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
African Americans
Attitude to Health
Culture
Depression
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Southeastern United States
jenkins-FCD Prod-353 9ccd8489072cb19f5b9f808bb23ed672c582f41e