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Influence of diet and genetics on hypertension and renal disease in Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Physiol Genomics 2004 Jan 15;16(2):194-203 PMID: 14600213

Abstract

Experiments examined the influence of diet and genetics on hypertension and renal disease in inbred Dahl salt-sensitive (SS/Mcw) rats and consomic rats in which chromosomes 16 (SS.BN16) or 18 (SS.BN18) of the normotensive Brown Norway rat were inserted into the genetic background of the SS/Mcw. Dahl SS/Mcw breeders and offspring were randomly placed on a purified AIN-76A diet or a grain-based diet, and male offspring were screened for cardiovascular and renal phenotypes following 3 wk on a 4.0% NaCl diet. High-salt arterial blood pressure (162 +/- 5 mmHg, n = 10), urinary protein excretion (147 +/- 16 mg/day, n = 14), and albumin excretion (72 +/- 9 mg/day, n = 14) were significantly elevated in the Dahl SS/Mcw maintained on the purified diet compared with rats fed the grain-based diet. Rats fed the purified diet also exhibited significantly more renal glomerular and tubular damage than rats fed the grain diet. Moreover, feeding the purified diet to the parents led to a significant increase in blood pressure in the offspring, regardless of offspring diet. Similar dietary effects were observed in SS.BN16 and SS.BN18 rats. In rats fed the purified diet, substitution of chromosomes 16 or 18 led to a significant decrease in arterial blood pressure, albumin excretion, and protein excretion compared with the SS/Mcw. Chromosomal substitution did not, however, affect albumin or protein excretion in the consomic rats compared with the SS/Mcw when the rats were maintained on the grain diet. These data demonstrate a significant influence of diet composition on salt-induced hypertension and renal disease in the Dahl SS/Mcw rat.

Author List

Mattson DL, Kunert MP, Kaldunski ML, Greene AS, Roman RJ, Jacob HJ, Cowley AW Jr

Authors

Allen W. Cowley Jr PhD Chair, Professor in the Physiology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Andrew S. Greene PhD Interim Vice Chair, Chief, Professor in the Biomedical Engineering department at Medical College of Wisconsin
David L. Mattson PhD Professor in the Physiology department at Medical College of Wisconsin

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Animals
Chromosomes, Mammalian
Diet
Hypertension
Kidney Diseases
Male
Rats
Rats, Inbred Dahl



View this publication's entry at the Pubmed website PMID: 14600213
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