Medical College of Wisconsin
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Ca(2+)-activated potassium (K(Ca)) channel inhibition decreases neuronal activity-blood flow coupling. Brain Res 2002 Sep 06;948(1-2):108-16 PMID: 12383961

Abstract

A number of possible mediators have been proposed to couple neuronal activity with local cerebral metabolic activity and blood flow, but the mechanisms by which these mediators act is still unclear. In order to explore these coupling mechanisms, we used the rodent whisker-barrel cortex (WBC) model to test the hypothesis that modulation of K(Ca) channels is an important step in this coupling process. Anesthetized rats were prepared for laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) or evoked potential recordings utilizing a thinned cranial window over WBC. Superfusion of the K(Ca) channel blockers tetraethylammonium (TEA) or iberiotoxin directly onto WBC attenuated the magnitude of the whisker evoked LDF changes. Similar effects were seen after intravenous administration of TEA. Although attenuated, neither the temporal profile of the elicited blood flow responses nor the evoked electrical activity in WBC were affected by K(Ca) blockade. These data suggest that the process of cerebral metabolism/blood flow coupling in the rodent WBC involves K(Ca) channels.

Author List

Gerrits RJ, Stein EA, Greene AS

Authors

Ron Gerrits BS,PhD Faculty in the Biomedical Engineering department at Milwaukee School of Engineering
Andrew S. Greene PhD Interim Vice Chair, Chief, Professor in the Biomedical Engineering department at Medical College of Wisconsin

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Animals
Blood Flow Velocity
Blood Gas Analysis
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Drug Administration Routes
Laser-Doppler Flowmetry
Male
Membrane Potentials
Neurons
Peptides
Perfusion
Physical Stimulation
Potassium Channel Blockers
Potassium Channels, Calcium-Activated
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Somatosensory Cortex
Synaptic Transmission
Tetraethylammonium
Vibrissae



View this publication's entry at the Pubmed website PMID: 12383961
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