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Role of peripheral reflexes in the initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 2014 Apr 15;306(8):G728-37

Date

02/22/2014

Pubmed ID

24557762

Pubmed Central ID

PMC3989705

DOI

10.1152/ajpgi.00411.2013

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-84900537950   3 Citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the role of peripheral reflexes in initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing. In 10 decerebrate cats, we recorded electromyographic responses from the pharynx, larynx, and esophagus and manometric data from the esophagus. Water (1-5 ml) was injected into the nasopharynx to stimulate swallowing, and the timing of the pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing was quantified. The effects of transection or stimulation of nerves innervating the esophagus on swallowing and esophageal motility were tested. We found that the percent occurrence of the esophageal phase was significantly related to the bolus size. While the time delays between the pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing were not related to the bolus size, they were significantly more variable than the time delays between activation of muscles within the pharyngeal phase. Transection of the sensory innervation of the proximal cervical esophagus blocked or significantly inhibited activation of the esophageal phase in the proximal cervical esophagus. Peripheral electrical stimulation of the pharyngoesophageal nerve activated the proximal cervical esophagus, peripheral electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve activated the distal cervical esophagus, and peripheral electrical stimulation the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) had no effect on the esophagus. Centripetal electrical stimulation of the SLN activated the cervical component of the esophageal phase of swallowing before initiation of the pharyngeal phase. Therefore, we concluded that initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing depends on feedback from peripheral reflexes acting through the SLN, rather than a central program.

Author List

Lang IM, Medda BK, Babaei A, Shaker R

Authors

Ivan M. Lang DVM, PhD Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Bidyut K. Medda PhD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Reza Shaker MD Assoc Provost, Sr Assoc Dean, Ctr Dir, Chief, Prof in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Animals
Cats
Deglutition
Electromyography
Esophagus
Laryngeal Nerves
Larynx
Manometry
Motor Neurons
Pharynx
Physical Stimulation
Reaction Time
Reflex
Vagus Nerve
jenkins-FCD Prod-411 e00897e83867fcfa48419861683711f8d99adb75