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New questions about transplantation in multiple myeloma. Oncology (Williston Park) 2006 Sep;20(10):1230-42; discussion 1242, 1244, 1249-50 PMID: 17024872

Pubmed ID

17024872

Abstract

Multiple myeloma is now the most common indication for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in North America, with over 5,000 transplants performed yearly (Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research [CIBMTR] data). While the role of ASCT as initial therapy in multiple myeloma has been established by randomized studies, newer therapies are challenging the traditional paradigm. The availability of novel induction agents and newer risk stratification tools, and the increasing recognition of durability of remissions are changing the treatment paradigm. However, even with arduous therapy designed to produce more complete remissions-for example, tandem autologous transplants-we have seen no plateau in survival curves. A tandem autologous procedure followed by maintenance therapy may be performed in an attempt to sustain remission. Sequential autologous transplants followed by nonmyeloablative allotransplants are pursued with the hope of "curing" multiple myeloma. We examine how the key challenges of increasing the response rates and maintaining responses are being addressed using more effective induction and/or consolidation treatments and the need for maintenance therapies after ASCT. We argue that given the biologic heterogeneity of multiple myeloma, risk-adapted transplant approaches are warranted. While the role of curative-intent, dose-intense toxic therapy is still controversial, conventional myeloablative allogeneic transplants need to be reexamined as an option in high-risk aggressive myeloma, given improvements in supportive care and transplant-related mortality.

Author List

Hari P, Pasquini MC, Vesole DH

Authors

Parameswaran Hari MD Chief, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Marcelo C. Pasquini MD, MS Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-34250634391   3 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Humans
Multiple Myeloma
Patient Selection
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Remission Induction
Risk Assessment
Stem Cell Transplantation
Time Factors
Transplantation Conditioning
Transplantation, Autologous
Transplantation, Homologous
jenkins-FCD Prod-321 98992d628744e349846c2f62ac68f241d7e1ea70