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Transplantation outcomes for severe combined immunodeficiency, 2000-2009. N Engl J Med 2014 Jul 31;371(5):434-46 PMID: 25075835 PMCID: PMC4183064

Pubmed ID

25075835

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium was formed to analyze the results of hematopoietic-cell transplantation in children with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and other primary immunodeficiencies. Factors associated with a good transplantation outcome need to be identified in order to design safer and more effective curative therapy, particularly for children with SCID diagnosed at birth.

METHODS: We collected data retrospectively from 240 infants with SCID who had received transplants at 25 centers during a 10-year period (2000 through 2009).

RESULTS: Survival at 5 years, freedom from immunoglobulin substitution, and CD3+ T-cell and IgA recovery were more likely among recipients of grafts from matched sibling donors than among recipients of grafts from alternative donors. However, the survival rate was high regardless of donor type among infants who received transplants at 3.5 months of age or younger (94%) and among older infants without prior infection (90%) or with infection that had resolved (82%). Among actively infected infants without a matched sibling donor, survival was best among recipients of haploidentical T-cell-depleted transplants in the absence of any pretransplantation conditioning. Among survivors, reduced-intensity or myeloablative pretransplantation conditioning was associated with an increased likelihood of a CD3+ T-cell count of more than 1000 per cubic millimeter, freedom from immunoglobulin substitution, and IgA recovery but did not significantly affect CD4+ T-cell recovery or recovery of phytohemagglutinin-induced T-cell proliferation. The genetic subtype of SCID affected the quality of CD3+ T-cell recovery but not survival.

CONCLUSIONS: Transplants from donors other than matched siblings were associated with excellent survival among infants with SCID identified before the onset of infection. All available graft sources are expected to lead to excellent survival among asymptomatic infants. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and others.).

Author List

Pai SY, Logan BR, Griffith LM, Buckley RH, Parrott RE, Dvorak CC, Kapoor N, Hanson IC, Filipovich AH, Jyonouchi S, Sullivan KE, Small TN, Burroughs L, Skoda-Smith S, Haight AE, Grizzle A, Pulsipher MA, Chan KW, Fuleihan RL, Haddad E, Loechelt B, Aquino VM, Gillio A, Davis J, Knutsen A, Smith AR, Moore TB, Schroeder ML, Goldman FD, Connelly JA, Porteus MH, Xiang Q, Shearer WT, Fleisher TA, Kohn DB, Puck JM, Notarangelo LD, Cowan MJ, O'Reilly RJ

Author

Brent R. Logan PhD Director, Professor in the Institute for Health and Equity department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-84904876386   209 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

CD3 Complex
Female
Graft vs Host Disease
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Immunoglobulin A
Incidence
Infant
Lymphocyte Count
Male
Retreatment
Retrospective Studies
Severe Combined Immunodeficiency
Siblings
Survival Rate
T-Lymphocytes
Transplantation Conditioning
Treatment Outcome
jenkins-FCD Prod-299 9ef562391eceb2b8f95265c767fbba1ce5a52fd6