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Prospective study of infantile hemangiomas: demographic, prenatal, and perinatal characteristics. J Pediatr 2007 Mar;150(3):291-4 PMID: 17307549

Pubmed ID

17307549

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To characterize demographic, prenatal, and perinatal features of patients with infantile hemangiomas and to determine the importance of these factors in predicting rates of complication and treatment.

STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a prospective study at 7 U.S. pediatric dermatology clinics. A consecutive sample of 1058 children, aged 12 years and younger, with infantile hemangiomas was enrolled between September 2002 and October 2003. A standardized questionnaire was used to collect demographic, prenatal, perinatal, and hemangioma-specific data. National Vital Statistic System Data (NVSS) was used to compare demographic variables and relevant rates of prenatal events.

RESULTS: In comparison with the 2002 United States National Vital Statistics System birth data, we found that infants with hemangiomas were more likely to be female, white non-Hispanic, premature (P < .0001) and the product of a multiple gestation (10.6% versus 3.1%; P < .001). Maternal age was significantly higher (P < .0001), and placenta previa (3.1%) and pre-eclampsia (11.8%) were more common.

CONCLUSIONS: Infants with hemangiomas are more likely to be female, white non-Hispanic, premature, and products of multiple gestations. Prenatal associations include older maternal age, placenta previa, and pre-eclampsia. No demographic, prenatal, and perinatal factors predicted higher rates of complications or need for treatment.

Author List

Hemangioma Investigator Group, Haggstrom AN, Drolet BA, Baselga E, Chamlin SL, Garzon MC, Horii KA, Lucky AW, Mancini AJ, Metry DW, Newell B, Nopper AJ, Frieden IJ

Author

Beth A. Drolet MD Professor in the Dermatology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-33847298464   271 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fetal Diseases
Follow-Up Studies
Hemangioma
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Perinatal Care
Pregnancy
Prenatal Diagnosis
Probability
Prospective Studies
Risk Assessment
Sex Distribution
Skin Neoplasms
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
jenkins-FCD Prod-299 9ef562391eceb2b8f95265c767fbba1ce5a52fd6