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PhenoMiner: a quantitative phenotype database for the laboratory rat, Rattus norvegicus. Application in hypertension and renal disease. Database (Oxford) 2015;2015 PMID: 25632109 PMCID: PMC4309021

Pubmed ID

25632109

Abstract

Rats have been used extensively as animal models to study physiological and pathological processes involved in human diseases. Numerous rat strains have been selectively bred for certain biological traits related to specific medical interests. Recently, the Rat Genome Database (http://rgd.mcw.edu) has initiated the PhenoMiner project to integrate quantitative phenotype data from the PhysGen Program for Genomic Applications and the National BioResource Project in Japan as well as manual annotations from biomedical literature. PhenoMiner, the search engine for these integrated phenotype data, facilitates mining of data sets across studies by searching the database with a combination of terms from four different ontologies/vocabularies (Rat Strain Ontology, Clinical Measurement Ontology, Measurement Method Ontology and Experimental Condition Ontology). In this study, salt-induced hypertension was used as a model to retrieve blood pressure records of Brown Norway, Fawn-Hooded Hypertensive (FHH) and Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat strains. The records from these three strains served as a basis for comparing records from consomic/congenic/mutant offspring derived from them. We examined the cardiovascular and renal phenotypes of consomics derived from FHH and SS, and of SS congenics and mutants. The availability of quantitative records across laboratories in one database, such as these provided by PhenoMiner, can empower researchers to make the best use of publicly available data. Database URL: http://rgd.mcw.edu.

Author List

Wang SJ, Laulederkind SJ, Hayman GT, Petri V, Liu W, Smith JR, Nigam R, Dwinell MR, Shimoyama M

Authors

Melinda R. Dwinell PhD Center Associate Director, Associate Professor in the Physiology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Mary E. Shimoyama PhD Associate Professor in the Biomedical Engineering department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-84943179091   5 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Angiotensin Amide
Animals
Biological Ontologies
Data Mining
Databases, Genetic
Humans
Kidney Diseases
Rats
Software
jenkins-FCD Prod-300 626508253d14e4184314fb9f66322a03a5906796