Medical College of Wisconsin
CTSICores SearchResearch InformaticsREDCap

Hip-Hop to Health Jr., an obesity prevention program for minority preschool children: baseline characteristics of participants. Prev Med 2003 Mar;36(3):320-9

Date

03/14/2003

Pubmed ID

12634023

DOI

10.1016/s0091-7435(02)00068-3

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of obesity in the United States is a significant public health problem. Many obesity-related risk factors are more prevalent in minority populations. Given the recalcitrant nature of weight loss interventions for adults, prevention of overweight and obesity has become a high priority. The present study reports baseline data from an obesity prevention intervention developed for minority preschool children.

METHODS: Hip-Hop to Health Jr. is a 5-year randomized controlled intervention that targets 3- to 5-year-old minority children enrolled in 24 Head Start programs. Our primary aim is to test the effect of the intervention on change in body mass index. Data were collected on sociodemographic, anthropometric, behavioral, and cognitive variables for the children and parents at baseline.

RESULTS: Participants included 416 black children, 337 black parents, 362 Latino children, and 309 Latino parents. Using body mass index for age and sex > or = the 95th percentile as the definition of overweight, 15% of the black children and 28% of the Latino children were overweight. More than 75% of the parents were either overweight or obese.

DISCUSSION: The development of interventions to effectively prevent or control obesity early in life is crucial. These data highlight the escalating problem of weight control in minority populations.

Author List

Stolley MR, Fitzgibbon ML, Dyer A, Van Horn L, KauferChristoffel K, Schiffer L

Author

Melinda Stolley PhD Center Associate Director, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

African Americans
Body Height
Body Mass Index
Body Weight
Child, Preschool
Diet
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion
Hispanic Americans
Humans
Life Style
Male
Obesity
Preventive Medicine
Primary Prevention
Program Development
Risk Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
jenkins-FCD Prod-411 e00897e83867fcfa48419861683711f8d99adb75