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Effects of an obesity prevention program on the eating behavior of African American mothers and daughters. Health Educ Behav 1997 Apr;24(2):152-64

Date

04/01/1997

Pubmed ID

9079575

DOI

10.1177/109019819702400204

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one cause of death in the United States. Obesity is highly related to CVD risk, especially in African American women. This study explored the efficacy of a culturally specific obesity prevention program. Designed for low-income, inner-city African American girls and their mothers, the program addressed the importance of eating a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet and increasing activity. Mother-daughter dyads were randomly assigned to a 12-week treatment or an attention placebo group. Participants were assessed at pre- and posttreatment on dietary intake, including daily fat intake, daily saturated fat intake, percentage of daily calories from fat, and daily cholesterol intake. Results showed significant differences between the treatment and control mothers for daily saturated fat intake and percentage of calories from fat. Differences among treatment and control groups were also noted for the daughters on percentage of daily calories from fat. Implications of the findings for developing culturally specific health risk reduction programs are discussed.

Author List

Stolley MR, Fitzgibbon ML

Author

Melinda Stolley PhD Center Associate Director, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

African Americans
Cardiovascular Diseases
Chicago
Child
Cultural Characteristics
Curriculum
Feeding Behavior
Female
Health Behavior
Health Education
Humans
Life Style
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers
Obesity
Remedial Teaching
Risk Factors
Urban Population
jenkins-FCD Prod-402 0f9a74600e4e79798f8fa6f545ea115f3dd948b2