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Evaluation of a social marketing campaign to increase awareness of immunizations for urban low-income children. WMJ 2015 Feb;114(1):10-5 PMID: 25845130 PMCID: PMC4390996

Pubmed ID

25845130

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess community awareness of childhood immunizations and intent to immunize children after a social marketing immunization campaign.

METHODS: We used 2 interviewer-assisted street-intercept surveys to evaluate awareness of childhood immunizations and intent to immunize low-income children. The "Take Control! Immunize" social marketing campaign was developed using a community-based participatory research approach and used billboards, flyers, and various "walking billboard" (eg, backpacks, pens) to deliver immunization messages in the community settings.

RESULTS: Over 85% of community members recalled the "Take Control! Immunize" message. Almost half of those who saw the immunization message indicated that the message motivated them to act, including getting their children immunized or calling their physician to inquire about their children's immunizations status. All respondents indicated that immunizations were important for children and that they were likely or very likely to immunize their children. Respondents who reported that "Take Control!" messages motivated them to act in the first intercept survey were significantly more likely than those in the second intercept to report being likely or very likely to immunize their children.

CONCLUSION: Culturally appropriate social marketing immunization messages in targeted urban settings can increase parental awareness and behavioral intention to immunize children.

Author List

Ngui EM, Hamilton C, Nugent M, Simpson P, Willis E

Authors

Pippa M. Simpson PhD Chief, Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Earnestine Willis MD, MPH Chief, Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-84923780197   3 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Awareness
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Immunization Programs
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parents
Poverty
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Social Marketing
Surveys and Questionnaires
Urban Population
Wisconsin
jenkins-FCD Prod-321 98992d628744e349846c2f62ac68f241d7e1ea70