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Evaluation of pediatric manual wheelchair mobility using advanced biomechanical methods. Biomed Res Int 2015;2015:634768 PMID: 25802860 PMCID: PMC4352734

Pubmed ID

25802860

Abstract

There is minimal research of upper extremity joint dynamics during pediatric wheelchair mobility despite the large number of children using manual wheelchairs. Special concern arises with the pediatric population, particularly in regard to the longer duration of wheelchair use, joint integrity, participation and community integration, and transitional care into adulthood. This study seeks to provide evaluation methods for characterizing the biomechanics of wheelchair use by children with spinal cord injury (SCI). Twelve subjects with SCI underwent motion analysis while they propelled their wheelchair at a self-selected speed and propulsion pattern. Upper extremity joint kinematics, forces, and moments were computed using inverse dynamics methods with our custom model. The glenohumeral joint displayed the largest average range of motion (ROM) at 47.1° in the sagittal plane and the largest average superiorly and anteriorly directed joint forces of 6.1% BW and 6.5% BW, respectively. The largest joint moments were 1.4% body weight times height (BW × H) of elbow flexion and 1.2% BW × H of glenohumeral joint extension. Pediatric manual wheelchair users demonstrating these high joint demands may be at risk for pain and upper limb injuries. These evaluation methods may be a useful tool for clinicians and therapists for pediatric wheelchair prescription and training.

Author List

Slavens BA, Schnorenberg AJ, Aurit CM, Graf A, Krzak JJ, Reiners K, Vogel LC, Harris GF

Authors

Gerald Harris PhD Director in the Orthopaedic Research Engineering Center (OREC) department at Marquette University
Brooke Slavens BS,MS,PhD Assistant Professor in the Occupational Science & Technology department at University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee




Scopus

2-s2.0-84924546212   1 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adolescent
Biomechanical Phenomena
Child
Female
Humans
Joints
Kinetics
Male
Movement
Time Factors
Wheelchairs
Young Adult
jenkins-FCD Prod-300 626508253d14e4184314fb9f66322a03a5906796