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Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Characteristics and Their Association With Survival and Neurobehavioral Outcome. Pediatr Crit Care Med 2016 12;17(12):e543-e550 PMID: 27679965 PMCID: PMC5138073

Pubmed ID

27679965

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate relationships between cardiac arrest characteristics and survival and neurobehavioral outcome among children recruited to the Therapeutic Hypothermia after Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Out-of-Hospital trial.

DESIGN: Secondary analysis of Therapeutic Hypothermia after Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Out-of-Hospital trial data.

SETTING: Thirty-six PICUs in the United States and Canada.

PATIENTS: All children (n = 295) had chest compressions for greater than or equal to 2 minutes, were comatose, and required mechanical ventilation after return of circulation.

INTERVENTIONS: Neurobehavioral function was assessed using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition at baseline (reflecting prearrest status) and 12 months postarrest. U.S. norms for Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition scores are 100 (mean) ± 15 (SD). Higher scores indicate better functioning. Outcomes included 12-month survival and 12-month survival with Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition greater than or equal to 70.

MEASUREMENT AND MAIN RESULTS: Cardiac etiology of arrest, initial arrest rhythm of ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia, shorter duration of chest compressions, compressions not required at hospital arrival, fewer epinephrine doses, and witnessed arrest were associated with greater 12-month survival and 12-month survival with Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition greater than or equal to 70. Weekend arrest was associated with lower 12-month survival. Body habitus was associated with 12-month survival with Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition greater than or equal to 70; underweight children had better outcomes, and obese children had worse outcomes. On multivariate analysis, acute life threatening event/sudden unexpected infant death, chest compressions more than 30 minutes, and weekend arrest were associated with lower 12-month survival; witnessed arrest was associated with greater 12-month survival. Acute life threatening event/sudden unexpected infant death, other respiratory causes of arrest except drowning, other/unknown causes of arrest, and compressions more than 30 minutes were associated with lower 12-month survival with Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition greater than or equal to 70.

CONCLUSIONS: Many factors are associated with survival and neurobehavioral outcome among children who are comatose and require mechanical ventilation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. These factors may be useful for identifying children at risk for poor outcomes, and for improving prevention and resuscitation strategies.

Author List

Meert KL, Telford R, Holubkov R, Slomine BS, Christensen JR, Dean JM, Moler FW, Therapeutic Hypothermia after Pediatric Cardiac Arrest (THAPCA) Trial Investigators

Authors

Michael T. Meyer MD Chief, Associate Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Martin K. Wakeham MD Associate Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-84988975983   12 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adolescent
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Child
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypothermia, Induced
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Prognosis
Respiration, Artificial
Survival Rate
jenkins-FCD Prod-296 4db9d02597e0a2e889e230f853b641c12f1c3ee3