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The power of combining adoptive cell therapy (ACT) and pathogen-boosted vaccination to treat solid tumors. Hum Vaccin Immunother 2017 10 03;13(10):2269-2271

Date

07/15/2017

Pubmed ID

28708956

Pubmed Central ID

PMC5647994

DOI

10.1080/21645515.2017.1345833

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85031923440

Abstract

Recent advancements in adoptive cell therapy (ACT) are opening up new frontiers for cancer immunotherapy. CAR T cells targeting CD19 have emerged as a remarkable T cell-based therapy for the successful treatment of certain types of leukemia and lymphomas. Despite these clinical successes, as well as significant breakthroughs in T cell engineering, the treatment of solid tumors with ACT remains a relentless challenge. Thus, the current consensus of the field is that an urgent need exists for the design of innovative approaches that can improve the efficacy of ACT in treating solid cancers while maintaining a high degree of reliability and safety.

Author List

Zander R, Cui W

Author

Weiguo Cui PhD Associate Professor in the Microbiology and Immunology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Animals
Antigens, CD19
Antigens, Neoplasm
Bacteria
Cancer Vaccines
Humans
Immunization, Secondary
Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Mice
Neoplasms
Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell
Reproducibility of Results
T-Lymphocytes
Vaccination
jenkins-FCD Prod-399 190a069c593fb5498b7fcd942f44b7bc9cdc7ea1