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PHENOTYPIC VARIABILITY IN INDIVIDUALS WITH TYPE V OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA WITH IDENTICAL IFITM5 MUTATIONS. J Rare Disord 2013 Dec;1(2):37-42 PMID: 28824928 PMCID: PMC5560441

Pubmed ID

28824928

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type V is a dominantly inherited skeletal dysplasia characterized by fractures and progressive deformity of long bones. In addition, patients often present with radial head dislocation, hyperplastic callus, and calcification of the forearm interosseous membrane. Recently, a specific mutation in the gene was found to be responsible for OI type V. This mutation, a C to T transition 14 nucleotides upstream from the endogenous start codon, creates a new start methionine that appears to be preferentially used by the translational machinery. However, the mechanism by which the lengthened protein results in a dominant type of OI is unknown.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We report 7 ethnically diverse (African-American, Caucasian, Hispanic, and African) individuals with OI type V from 2 families and 2 sporadic cases. Exome sequencing failed to identify a causative mutation. Using Sanger sequencing, we found that all affected individuals in our cohort possess the c.-14 variant, further supporting the notion that OI type V is caused by a single, discrete mutation. Our patient cohort demonstrated inter-and intrafamilial phenotypic variability, including a father with classic OI type V whose daughter had a phenotype similar to OI type I. This clinical variability suggests that modifier genes influence the OI type V phenotype. We also confirm that the mutation creates an aberrant IFITM5 protein containing an additional 5 amino acids at the N-terminus.

CONCLUSIONS: The variable clinical signs in these cases illustrate the significant variability of the OI type V phenotype caused by the c.-14 mutation. The affected individuals are more ethnically diverse than previously reported.

Author List

Fitzgerald J, Holden P, Wright H, Wilmot B, Hata A, Steiner RD, Basel D

Author

Donald Basel MD Chief, Associate Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




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