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Early psychological aspects of severe hand injury. J Hand Surg Br 1988 May;13(2):177-80 PMID: 3385296

Pubmed ID

3385296

Abstract

We investigated the incidence and nature of psychological symptoms occurring during the first two months after severe hand injuries. 94% of patients had significant symptoms at some point early in rehabilitation, including nightmares (92%), flashbacks (88%), affective lability (84%), preoccupation with phantom limb sensations (13%), concentration/attention problems (12%), cosmetic concerns (10%), fear of death (5%), and denial of amputation (3%). Two months later, flashbacks (63%) remained pronounced. Nightmares (13%), affective lability (48%), concentration/attention problems (5%), fear of death (0%), and denial of amputation (0%) declined markedly, while cosmetic concerns (17%) and preoccupation with phantom limb sensations (17%) increased. Based on these findings, we believe that psychological treatment should often be given as part of the rehabilitation process.

Author List

Grunert BK, Smith CJ, Devine CA, Fehring BA, Matloub HS, Sanger JR, Yousif NJ

Authors

Brad K. Grunert PhD Professor in the Plastic Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Hani S. Matloub MD Professor in the Plastic Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
James R. Sanger MD Professor in the Plastic Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-0023921677   62 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Affective Symptoms
Amputation, Traumatic
Dreams
Hand Injuries
Humans
Phantom Limb
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic
Time Factors
jenkins-FCD Prod-310 bff9d975ec7f2d302586822146c2801dd4449aad