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Self-Assessment Feedback Form Improves Quality of Out-of-Hospital CPR. Prehosp Emerg Care 2018 Aug 17:1-8 PMID: 30118617

Pubmed ID

30118617

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Various continuous quality improvement (CQI) approaches have been used to improve quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) delivered at the scene of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We evaluated a post-event, self-assessment, CQI feedback form to determine its impact on delivery of CPR quality metrics.

METHODS: This before/after retrospective review evaluated data from a CQI program in a midsized urban emergency medical services (EMS) system using CPR quality metrics captured by Zoll Medical Inc. X-series defibrillator ECG files in adult patients (≥18 years old) with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Two 9-month periods, one before and one after implementation of the feedback form on December 31, 2013 were evaluated. Metrics included the mean and percentage of goal achievement for chest compression depth (goal: >5 centimeters [cm]; >90%/episode), rate (goal: 100-120 compressions/minute [min]), chest compression fraction (goal: ≥75%), and preshock pause (goal: <10 seconds [sec]). The feedback form was distributed to all EMS providers involved in the resuscitation within 72 hours for self-review.

RESULTS: A total of 439 encounters before and 621 encounters after were evaluated including basic life support (BLS) and advanced life support (ALS) providers. The Before Group consisted of 408 patients with an average age of 61 ± 17 years, 61.8% male. The After Group consisted of 556 patients with an average age of 61 ± 17 years, 58.3% male. Overall, combining BLS and ALS encounters, the mean CPR metric values before and after were: chest compression depth (5.0 cm vs. 5.5 cm; p < 0.001), rate (109.6/min vs 114.8/min; p < 0.001), fraction (79.2% vs. 86.4%; p < 0.001), and preshock pause (18.8 sec vs. 11.8 sec; p < 0.001), respectively. Overall, the percent goal achievement before and after were: chest compression depth (48.5% vs. 66.6%; p < 0.001), rate (71.8% vs. 71.7%, p = 0.78), fraction (68.1% vs. 91.0%; p < 0.001), and preshock pause (24.1% vs. 59.5%; p < 0.001), respectively. The BLS encounters and ALS encounters had similar statistically significant improvements seen in all metrics.

CONCLUSION: This post-event, self-assessment CQI feedback form was associated with significant improvement in delivery of out-of-hospital CPR depth, fraction and preshock pause time.

Author List

Weston BW, Jasti J, Mena M, Unteriner J, Tillotson K, Yin Z, Colella MR, Aufderheide TP

Authors

Mario R. Colella DO, MPH Professor in the Emergency Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Benjamin Weston MD, MPH Assistant Professor in the Emergency Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




jenkins-FCD Prod-299 9ef562391eceb2b8f95265c767fbba1ce5a52fd6