Medical College of Wisconsin
CTSICores SearchResearch InformaticsREDCap

SCID genotype and 6-month posttransplant CD4 count predict survival and immune recovery. Blood 2018 Oct 25;132(17):1737-1749 PMID: 30154114 PMCID: PMC6202916

Pubmed ID

30154114

DOI

10.1182/blood-2018-03-840702

Abstract

The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) performed a retrospective analysis of 662 patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) who received a hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as first-line treatment between 1982 and 2012 in 33 North American institutions. Overall survival was higher after HCT from matched-sibling donors (MSDs). Among recipients of non-MSD HCT, multivariate analysis showed that the SCID genotype strongly influenced survival and immune reconstitution. Overall survival was similar for patients with , , or defects and was significantly better compared with patients with or mutations. Patients with or mutations had poorer immune reconstitution than other genotypes. Although survival did not correlate with the type of conditioning regimen, recipients of reduced-intensity or myeloablative conditioning had a lower incidence of treatment failure and better T- and B-cell reconstitution, but a higher risk for graft-versus-host disease, compared with those receiving no conditioning or immunosuppression only. Infection-free status and younger age at HCT were associated with improved survival. Typical SCID, leaky SCID, and Omenn syndrome had similar outcomes. Landmark analysis identified CD4 and CD4CD45RA cell counts at 6 and 12 months post-HCT as biomarkers predictive of overall survival and long-term T-cell reconstitution. Our data emphasize the need for patient-tailored treatment strategies depending upon the underlying SCID genotype. The prognostic significance of CD4 cell counts as early as 6 months after HCT emphasizes the importance of close follow-up of immune reconstitution to identify patients who may need additional intervention to prevent poor long-term outcome.

Author List

Haddad E, Logan BR, Griffith LM, Buckley RH, Parrott RE, Prockop SE, Small TN, Chaisson J, Dvorak CC, Murnane M, Kapoor N, Abdel-Azim H, Hanson IC, Martinez C, Bleesing JJH, Chandra S, Smith AR, Cavanaugh ME, Jyonouchi S, Sullivan KE, Burroughs L, Skoda-Smith S, Haight AE, Tumlin AG, Quigg TC, Taylor C, Dávila Saldaña BJ, Keller MD, Seroogy CM, Desantes KB, Petrovic A, Leiding JW, Shyr DC, Decaluwe H, Teira P, Gillio AP, Knutsen AP, Moore TB, Kletzel M, Craddock JA, Aquino V, Davis JH, Yu LC, Cuvelier GDE, Bednarski JJ, Goldman FD, Kang EM, Shereck E, Porteus MH, Connelly JA, Fleisher TA, Malech HL, Shearer WT, Szabolcs P, Thakar MS, Vander Lugt MT, Heimall J, Yin Z, Pulsipher MA, Pai SY, Kohn DB, Puck JM, Cowan MJ, O'Reilly RJ, Notarangelo LD

Author

Brent R. Logan PhD Director, Professor in the Institute for Health and Equity department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-85055612463   7 Citations
jenkins-FCD Prod-332 f92a19b0ec5e8e1eff783fac390ec127e367c2b5