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Novel plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae from Ohio. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1986 Aug;30(2):220-4

Date

08/01/1986

Pubmed ID

3490215

Pubmed Central ID

PMC180522

DOI

10.1128/aac.30.2.220

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies of plasmid-mediated resistance at the Cleveland Veterans Administration Medical Center revealed that related plasmids had disseminated among members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. We studied the beta-lactamases encoded by these plasmids in Escherichia coli C600 transformants or transconjugants. Substrate and inhibition profiles of the enzymes determined by two of these plasmids suggested an activity resembling TEM-1; however, isoelectric focusing revealed a pI of 7.0. These two plasmids were originally found in a Serratia marcescens (pDS076) and an Enterobacter cloacae (pDS075) strain isolated from the same sink in the medical intensive care unit and later, in an Enterobacter cloacae (pDS142 identical to pDS076) isolate colonizing a patient in the same unit. The plasmids also carried the aminoglycoside resistance determinant, 2"-aminoglycoside nucleotidyl transferase. A 2-kilobase AvaI restriction endonuclease digestion fragment of pSD075 known to carry the beta-lactamase determinant was used as a molecular probe. This probe did not recognize sequences of any plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase tested including the recently described determinants ROB-1, TLE-1, and OXA-4-7. A TEM-1 probe derived from the 0.7-kilobase PstI-EcoRI fragment of pBR322 failed to recognize the new beta-lactamase gene. Four additional Enterobacter cloacae and two Enterobacter aerogenes strains isolated in Columbus, Ohio, have been shown to produce a pI 7.0 beta-lactamase and to carry plasmids recognized by the 2-kilobase probe. These data suggest dissemination of a novel plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase among members of the family Enterobacteriaceae in Ohio and demonstrate the development and utility of a molecular probe for the new determinant. We suggest that the novel beta-lactamase be named OHIO-1.

Author List

Shlaes DM, Medeiros AA, Kron MA, Currie-McCumber C, Papa E, Vartian CV

Author

Michael Kron MD Director, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

DNA, Bacterial
Electrophoresis, Agar Gel
Enterobacteriaceae
Genes, Bacterial
Humans
Isoelectric Focusing
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Ohio
Plasmids
beta-Lactamases
jenkins-FCD Prod-410 e9586552fe7f53c71f7923aa6e27aeabbd3c2473