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Measurement of peripheral blood flow by thermodilution techniques. Invest Radiol 1986 Aug;21(8):631-6 PMID: 3744738

Abstract

Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular pathology, including balloon angioplasty of atherosclerotic lesions in peripheral vascular disease, have led to an increased need for in vivo quantitation of blood flow. This study has three purposes: (1) to validate thermodilution techniques as a viable method for measuring low blood flow rates, (2) to calibrate accurately thermodilution catheters at these low flows, and (3) to develop an animal model that can be used to quantitate and compare many different flow measuring techniques. Modified commercially available 6F thermodilution catheters were used with a standard cardiac output computer to measure flows between 200 and 700 ml/minute. Eight anesthetized dogs were surgically interfaced with a variable flow, pressure, and compliance carotid-carotid/jugular bypass perfusion system. Three milliliters of normal saline at room temperature were injected through the catheters intra-arterially to measure different flows below, at, and above physiologic pressures and compliances. Results of this study indicate that with proper calibration, thermodilution techniques of measuring arterial and venous flows between 200 and 700 ml/minute are simple, accurate, and reliable. Using the designed system to generate known flows in vivo at various physiologic conditions allowed easy calibration of catheters and should facilitate calibration and comparison of other measurement techniques.

Author List

Nadel SN, Greene AS, White RI Jr, Anderson JH

Author

Andrew S. Greene PhD Interim Vice Chair, Chief, Professor in the Biomedical Engineering department at Medical College of Wisconsin

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Animals
Calibration
Cardiac Output
Catheterization
Dogs
Extracorporeal Circulation
Hemodynamics
Models, Biological
Regional Blood Flow
Thermodilution



View this publication's entry at the Pubmed website PMID: 3744738
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