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Cell adherence to microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus: a comparative study. Ciba Found Symp 1987;127:146-63

Date

01/01/1987

Pubmed ID

3595320

DOI

10.1002/9780470513446.ch10

Abstract

The conditions were examined for in vitro antibody-mediated adherence of granulocytes to microfilariae of Onchocera volvulus and Dirofilaria immitis. Reactivity in human sera from patients in endemic foci in Sudan was specific for O. volvulus and no reactions were observed with heterologous Onchocerca species or with Mansonella perstans. Microfilariae from skin, nodules or adult female worms were satisfactory targets for cell adherence, and the cells involved were almost exclusively eosinophils. The reaction was inhibited by indomethacin but not by nordihydroguaiaretic acid, an inhibitor of leukotriene production. Agents that slowed or stopped microfilarial motility (e.g. nifedipine, lidocaine, chloroquine) inhibited the reaction, probably by reducing target/cell contact. Ivermectin did not enhance the reaction, and in the absence of cells exerted only slight effects on the movement of microfilariae at higher concentrations (greater than 10 micrograms/ml). Antibody activity was labile, and did not persist well through freeze-thaw cycles. Some differences between homologous and heterologous mixtures (microfilariae/cells/serum) were seen but they could not be resolved satisfactorily. There were no apparent geographical differences between microfilariae from different foci in Sudan. In the D. immitis system neutrophils were the dominant cell type adhering to microfilariae, and the activity was stable to storage and freeze-thaw. No enhancement was detectable with diethylcarbamazine. Antibody activity was absorbable with microfilarial antigens and was reduced by agents that inhibited microfilarial motility. In dogs, adherence-mediating antibody was seen only in amicrofilaraemic animals with occult infection, and in only a minority of these sera. In humans the relationship to clinical findings was less clear, but patients with punctate keratitis were the most likely to have positive serum and were the most reactive in the assay. This system may therefore offer some insights into disease mechanisms in vivo, and its molecular mechanisms deserve further characterization.

Author List

Williams JF, Ghalib HW, Mackenzie CD, Elkhalifa MY, Ayuya JM, Kron MA

Author

Michael Kron MD Director, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Animals
Antibodies
Cell Adhesion
Dirofilaria immitis
Dirofilariasis
Dog Diseases
Dogs
Eosinophils
Female
Granulocytes
Humans
Keratitis
Mansonella
Mansonelliasis
Microfilariae
Onchocerca
Onchocerciasis
Skin Diseases, Parasitic
jenkins-FCD Prod-388 89e904233d719332173309c68ab82b0b2a78a3a7