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Characteristics of mid- to long-latency spinal somatosensory evoked potentials following spinal trauma in the rat. J Neurotrauma 2008 Nov;25(11):1323-34

Date

11/04/2008

Pubmed ID

18976168

DOI

10.1089/neu.2008.0575

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-57349100851   6 Citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to develop and implement a new technique for repeated monitoring of spinal mid- to long-latency somatosensory evoked potentials (SpSEPs) during sciatic nerve stimulation following recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. Results of this study showed significant reproducibility of SpSEP components between specimens (analysis of variance [ANOVA], p > 0.05) and recording days (ANOVA, p > 0.700) using this technique. SpSEP amplitudes were significantly reduced (approximately 50% of uninjured amplitude, ANOVA, p < 0.001) following SCI and remained depressed for 10 weeks post-injury. SpSEP amplitude following high-intensity stimuli (> 1 mA) correlated with BBB locomotor score (Pearson, R > 0.353, P < 0.001). Characteristics of the mid- to long-latency SpSEPs suggest these components may reflect the integrity of the lateral pain pathway within the spinothalamic tract (STT). The technique and data presented in this study may be useful in future studies aimed at quantifying spinal cord integrity following injury and treatment using the rat model of SCI.

Author List

Ellingson BM, Kurpad SN, Schmit BD

Authors

Shekar N. Kurpad MD, PhD Chair, Professor in the Neurosurgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Brian Schmit PhD Professor in the Biomedical Engineering department at Marquette University




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Animals
Behavior, Animal
Contusions
Electric Stimulation
Electrophysiology
Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory
Female
Movement
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Sciatic Nerve
Spinal Cord Injuries