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Regulation of sodium metabolism and extracellular fluid volume during development. Clin Perinatol 1992 Mar;19(1):15-31

Date

03/01/1992

Pubmed ID

1533579

DOI

10.1016/s0095-5108(18)30473-1

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-0026605114   18 Citations

Abstract

In addition to regulating developmental changes in body fluid content, the newborn kidney must maintain a positive sodium balance to ensure adequate body growth. Mechanisms by which the developing organism perceives changes in volume and the manner in which the kidney responds to these changes have been reviewed. Perception of changes in ECF volume is sensed by volume receptors that involve central nervous system signal processing (e.g., low- and high-pressure volume receptors) before influencing the kidney by way of the renal nerves or that are directly coupled with the kidney and do not involve central nervous system processing (e.g., juxtaglomerular apparatus, ANF, hepatic factors). Results presently available demonstrate that these mechanisms are functional early in life and that their sensitivity changes during development in accordance with the needs of the organism. In addition, the developing kidney has unique characteristics that allow it to maintain a positive sodium balance necessary for growth.

Author List

Robillard JE, Segar JL, Smith FG, Jose PA

Author

Jeffrey L. Segar MD Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
Animals
Atrial Natriuretic Factor
Body Water
Child
Dopamine
Embryonic and Fetal Development
Extracellular Space
Humans
Hydrocortisone
Infant, Newborn
Kidney
Prostaglandins
Rats
Renin-Angiotensin System
Sheep
Sodium
Swine
Water-Electrolyte Balance
jenkins-FCD Prod-478 d1509cf07a111124a2d122fd3df854cc0b993c00