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A New Paradigm for Addressing Health Disparities in Inner-City Environments: Adopting a Disaster Zone Approach. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities 2021 06;8(3):690-697

Date

08/14/2020

Pubmed ID

32789563

Pubmed Central ID

PMC7878568

DOI

10.1007/s40615-020-00828-1

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85089373972   1 Citation

Abstract

Inner cities are characterized by intergenerational poverty, limited educational opportunities, poor health, and high levels of segregation. Human capital, defined as the intangible, yet integral economically productive aspects of individuals, is limited by factors influencing inner-city populations. Inner-city environments are consistent with definitions of disasters causing a level of suffering that exceeds the capacity of the affected community. This article presents a framework for improving health among inner-city populations using a multidisciplinary approach drawn from medicine, economics, and disaster response. Results from focus groups and photovoice conducted in Milwaukee, WI are used as a case study for a perspective on using this approach to address health disparities. A disaster approach provides a long-term focus on improving overall health and decreasing health disparities in the inner city, instead of a short-term focus on immediate relief of a single symptom. Adopting a disaster approach to inner-city environments is an innovative way to address the needs of those living in some of the most marginalized communities in the country.

Author List

Egede LE, Walker RJ, Campbell JA, Dawson AZ, Davidson T

Authors

Jennifer Annette Campbell PhD, MPH Assistant Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Aprill Z. Dawson PhD, MPH Assistant Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Leonard E. Egede MD Center Director, Chief, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Rebekah Walker PhD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Cities
Disaster Planning
Health Promotion
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Poverty Areas
Urban Health
Wisconsin