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Relationship between adverse childhood experiences and perceived discrimination in adulthood. J Affect Disord 2020 12 01;277:999-1004

Date

10/18/2020

Pubmed ID

33065845

Pubmed Central ID

PMC7574677

DOI

10.1016/j.jad.2020.09.023

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85090887031   4 Citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and perceived discrimination impact health overtime, however little is known about their association.

METHODS: Data for 6,325 participants in the Midlife in the US (MIDUS) study were analyzed across three waves of data. ACEs included emotional or physical abuse, household dysfunction, or financial strain in childhood. Generalized Linear Models with Generalized Estimating Equation approach was used to test the unadjusted and adjusted associations for ACEs and perceived discrimination and perceived inequality.

RESULTS: Individuals with ACEs reported significantly higher perceived inequality in work (β=0.05, 95%CI 0.02-0.07), in home (β=0.06, 95%CI 0.04-0.09), in family relationships (β=0.09, 95%CI 0.06-0.11), perceived daily discrimination (β=0.77, 95%CI 0.58-0.96), and perceived lifetime discrimination (β=0.24, 95%CI 0.18-0.30). ACE types were significantly associated with more perceived inequality and perceived discrimination. . Abuse was independently associated with all outcomes after adjusting for household dysfunction, financial strain, age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, and income.

LIMITATIONS: Findings cannot speak to the temporal relationship between ACEs and discrimination. It should not be assumed that ACEs cause perceived discrimination, but rather that there is an important association that warrants further investigation.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings represent the first step in better understanding the relationship between ACEs and perceived discrimination. As both influence health across the lifespan, understanding the relationship, mechanisms, and pathways for intervening are of great importance from a population health perspective. Efforts to incorporate discussions on experiences with discrimination and inequality may be warranted as a part of treatment for ACEs to address psychosocial stressors across the lifespan.

Author List

Campbell JA, Walker RJ, Garacci E, Dawson AZ, Williams JS, Egede LE

Authors

Jennifer Annette Campbell PhD, MPH Assistant Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Aprill Z. Dawson PhD, MPH Assistant Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Leonard E. Egede MD Center Director, Chief, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Rebekah Walker PhD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Joni Williams MD, MPH Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
Child
Child Abuse
Emotions
Family Relations
Humans
Physical Abuse