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Quantifying direct effects of social determinants of health on systolic blood pressure in United States adult immigrants. J Behav Med 2021 Jun;44(3):345-354

Date

01/31/2021

Pubmed ID

33515173

Pubmed Central ID

PMC8131216

DOI

10.1007/s10865-020-00199-2

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85099908077   2 Citations

Abstract

Identify the pathway by which social determinants of health (SDoH) variables impact systolic blood pressure (SBP) in immigrants. Latent variables were used to assess the relationship between SDoH and SBP. Latent variables were identified using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) for (1) global socioeconomic status (SES) (education, income, number of hours worked per week), (2) stressors of immigration (life-course SES, immigration stress, immigration demand), (3) adaptation to immigration (perceived discrimination, perceived stress, health literacy), and (4) burden of disease (disability, comorbidities, chronic pain). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to investigate the relationship between immigrant specific latent variables and SBP. The study included 181 adult immigrants. The initial model (chi2 (77, n = 181) = 302.40, p < 0.001, RMSEA = 0.086, CFI = 0.84, TLI = 0.78, CD = 0.91) showed that stressors of immigration had a direct relationship with SBP (-0.35, p = 0.033); global (SES) had a direct relationship with burden of disease (-0.70, p = 0.007) and an indirect relationship with SBP by way of burden of disease (0.24, p = 0.015). The final model (chi2 (69, n = 181) = 149.98, p < 0.001, RMSEA = 0.054, CFI = 0.94, TLI = 0.91, CD = 0.96) maintained that global SES had a direct relationship with burden of disease (-0.40, p < 0.001) and an indirect relationship with SBP by way burden of disease (0.34, p < 0.001). This study suggests a direct relationship between burden of disease and SBP, and an indirect relationship between SES and SBP. Development of interventions should take burden of disease into account as a direct driver of blood pressure in immigrants, and address factors related to SES.

Author List

Dawson AZ, Walker RJ, Gregory C, Egede LE

Authors

Aprill Z. Dawson PhD, MPH Assistant Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Leonard E. Egede MD Center Director, Chief, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Rebekah Walker PhD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
Blood Pressure
Emigrants and Immigrants
Humans
Social Class
Social Determinants of Health
United States