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Contributions of social determinants of health to systolic blood pressure in United States adult immigrants: Use of path analysis to validate a conceptual framework. Chronic Illn 2021 Mar 16:17423953211000412

Date

03/18/2021

Pubmed ID

33726528

Pubmed Central ID

PMC8443685

DOI

10.1177/17423953211000412

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85102657097   1 Citation

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Validate a conceptual framework and identify pathways between antecedent (life-course socioeconomic status (L-SES)), predisposing (age, sex, married, homeless as a child), enabling (health literacy, acculturation), and need (disability) social determinants of health (SDoH) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in US immigrants.

METHODS: 181 immigrants were enrolled in the study. Path analysis was used to identify paths by which SDoH influence SBP and to determine if antecedents, predisposing, enabling, and need factors have direct and indirect relationships with SBP.

RESULTS: The final model(chi2(5)=14.88, p = 0.011, RMSEA = 0.070, pclose = 0.17, CFI = 0.96) showed L-SES was directly associated with age (0.12, p = 0.019) and disability(0.17, p = 0.001); and indirectly associated with disability (0.29, p < 0.001) and SBP (0.31, p < 0.001). Age (0.31, p < 0.001) and sex(0.25, p < 0.001) were directly associated with SBP, and age was directly associated with disability (0.29, p < 0.001) and indirectly associated with SBP(0.14, p = 0.018). Other predisposing factors such as being married (-0.32, p < 0.001) and being homeless as a child alone (0.16, p < 0.001) were directly associated with disability and indirectly associated (0.14, p = 0.018) with SBP. Enabling factor of health literacy (0.16, p = 0.001) was directly associated with disability and indirectly associated (0.14, p = 0.018) with SBP. Need factor of disability (0.14, p = 0.018) was directly associated with SBP.

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides the first validation of a conceptual model for the relationship between SDoH and SBP among immigrants and identifies potential targets for focused interventions.

Author List

Dawson AZ, Walker RJ, Gregory C, Egede LE

Authors

Aprill Z. Dawson PhD, MPH Assistant Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Leonard E. Egede MD Center Director, Chief, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Rebekah Walker PhD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin