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Effect of cognitive impairment on risk of death in Hispanic/Latino adults over the age of 50 residing in the United States with and without diabetes: Data from the Health and Retirement Study 1995-2014. Alzheimers Dement 2022 Sep;18(9):1616-1624

Date

12/08/2021

Pubmed ID

34873809

Pubmed Central ID

PMC9170835

DOI

10.1002/alz.12521

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85120568724   1 Citation

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To understand the relationship between mortality and cognitive function among older US Hispanic adults with and without diabetes.

METHODS: Data from the Health and Retirement Study (1995-2014) were analyzed. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the association between mortality and cognitive function. Models were stratified by diabetes.

RESULTS: Four thousand thirteen older US Hispanic adults were included. Fully adjusted models for individuals with diabetes showed those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; hazard ratio [HR]: 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06, 2.45; P = .025) and dementia (HR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.25, 3.67; P = .006) had increased mortality compared to normal cognition. Fully adjusted models for individuals without diabetes showed those with MCI (HR: 1.87; 95% CI: 1.28, 2.74; P = .001) and dementia (HR: 3.25; 95% CI: 1.91, 5.55; P < .001) had increased mortality compared to normal cognition.

CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive impairment is associated with increased mortality in older US Hispanic adults with and without diabetes. Clinicians should regularly assess cognitive function in this group to quickly identify declines and make appropriate referrals for support to optimize health and reduce mortality.

Author List

Martinez M, Dawson AZ, Lu K, Walker RJ, Egede LE

Authors

Aprill Z. Dawson PhD, MPH Assistant Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Leonard E. Egede MD Center Director, Chief, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Rebekah Walker PhD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Aged
Cognitive Dysfunction
Dementia
Diabetes Mellitus
Humans
Retirement
Risk Factors
United States