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Reproducibility of newly developed spinal topography measurements for scoliosis. Open Orthop J 2012;6:226-30

Date

07/18/2012

Pubmed ID

22802917

Pubmed Central ID

PMC3395880

DOI

10.2174/1874325001206010226

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: In an effort to limit exposure to ionizing radiation and fully characterize three dimensional changes in the spine of patients with scoliosis reliable non-invasive methods of spinal back contour analysis (Milwaukee Topographic Scanner) (MTS) have been developed.

STUDY DESIGN: The current study compares spinal topography measurements among different subject positions and evaluates the reproducibility of the system for both inter-rater and intra-rater reliability.

METHODS: A dummy cast (plastic cast) of one patient with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis was created in order to test the reliability of the MTS. The dummy cast was positioned and rotated in 3D while scanned by two investigators using the MTS. A total of twelve parameters including Q-angle (an analog to X-ray's Cobb angle) were extracted.

RESULTS: All measurements of intra-rater and inter-rater reliability were excellent (Intraclass Correlation Coefficients ranging from 0.89 to 0.99) with the exception of Pelvic Tilt (intra-rater ICC is 0.61) and lordosis angle (inter-rater ICC is 0.82). No significant variability among investigators was observed for all tested metrics. No significant variability due to position was observed for the majority of back contour measurements but there were significant changes in the T1-S1 angle, T1-S1 deviation, T1-NC angle, T1-NC deviation, and Back Height metric (p< 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: The MTS is a reliable method of raster stereography in the measurement of the back contour, which will help monitor the progression of children with idiopathic scoliosis and reduce the use of X-rays.

Author List

Rankine L, Liu XC, Tassone C, Lyon R, Tarima S, Thometz J

Author

Sergey S. Tarima PhD Associate Professor in the Institute for Health and Equity department at Medical College of Wisconsin




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