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Nasal valve surgery improves disease-specific quality of life. Laryngoscope 2005 Mar;115(3):437-40

Date

03/04/2005

Pubmed ID

15744153

DOI

10.1097/01.mlg.0000157831.46250.ad

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Disease-specific quality-of-life (QOL) assessment of patients with nasal valve compromise and symptomatic nasal obstruction has not been studied previously. The objectives of the study were to determine whether surgical treatment of the nasal valve improves disease-specific QOL and to identify clinical or demographic variables predictive of patients' baseline QOL or change in QOL.

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, multi-institutional outcomes study of 20 patients with nasal obstruction and a surgically treatable diagnosis of nasal valve compromise.

METHODS: Disease-specific QOL assessment was performed using the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scale preoperatively (n = 20) and at 3 (n = 14) and 6 months (n = 20) after surgery. Clinical and demographic data were collected, along with physician-reported assessments of degree of nasal obstruction.

RESULTS: Mean NOSE scores significantly improved from baseline to 3 months after surgery (68.9 vs. 20.7 [P < .0001]), from baseline to 6 months after surgery (68.9 vs. 15.8 [P < .0001]), and from 3 to 6 months after surgery (20.7 vs. 15.8 [P = .0077]). Physician assessment of degree of nasal obstruction using a visual analogue scale was significantly correlated with baseline NOSE scores (P = .013) and change in NOSE scores at 6 months (P = .0015). No other clinical or demographic factors were found to be predictive.

CONCLUSION: In patients with symptomatic nasal obstruction and nasal valve compromise, surgical repair of the nasal valve improves disease-specific QOL. Physician rating of degree of nasal obstruction was found to be significantly correlated with patient-reported QOL.

Author List

Rhee JS, Poetker DM, Smith TL, Bustillo A, Burzynski M, Davis RE

Authors

David M. Poetker MD Chief, Professor in the Otolaryngology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
John S. Rhee MD Chair, Professor in the Otolaryngology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Nasal Obstruction
Nasal Septum
Nose
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Rhinoplasty
Time Factors
jenkins-FCD Prod-480 9a4deaf152b0b06dd18151814fff2e18f6c05280