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Acute clinical recovery from sport-related concussion. Neuropsychol Rev 2013 Dec;23(4):285-99

Date

11/20/2013

Pubmed ID

24248943

DOI

10.1007/s11065-013-9240-7

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-84891157305   22 Citations

Abstract

Concussion is a highly prevalent injury in contact and collision sports that has historically been poorly understood. An influx of sport-concussion research in recent years has led to a dramatic improvement in our understanding of the injury's defining characteristics and natural history of recovery. In this review, we discuss the current state of knowledge regarding the characteristic features of concussion and typical acute course of recovery, with an emphasis on the aspects of functioning most commonly assessed by clinicians and researchers (e.g., symptoms, cognitive deficits, postural stability). While prototypical clinical recovery is becoming better understood, questions remain regarding what factors (e.g., injury severity, demographic variables, history of prior concussions, psychological factors) may explain individual variability in recovery. Although research concerning individual differences in response to concussion is relatively new, and in many cases limited methodologically, we discuss the evidence about several potential moderators of concussion recovery and point out areas for future research. Finally, we describe how increased knowledge about the negative effects of and recovery following concussion has been translated into clinical guidelines for managing concussed athletes.

Author List

Nelson LD, Janecek JK, McCrea MA

Authors

Julie K. Janecek PhD Assistant Professor in the Neurology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Michael McCrea PhD Professor in the Neurosurgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Lindsay D. Nelson PhD Associate Professor in the Neurosurgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Athletic Injuries
Brain Concussion
Humans
Recovery of Function