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Importance of heat-labile enterotoxin in colonization of the adult mouse small intestine by human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains. Infect Immun 2006 Feb;74(2):869-75

Date

01/24/2006

Pubmed ID

16428729

Pubmed Central ID

PMC1360293

DOI

10.1128/IAI.74.2.869-875.2006

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-31844453571   101 Citations

Abstract

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections are a significant cause of diarrheal disease and infant mortality in developing countries. Studies of ETEC pathogenesis relevant to vaccine development have been greatly hampered by the lack of a suitable small-animal model of infection with human ETEC strains. Here, we demonstrate that adult immunocompetent outbred mice can be effectively colonized with the prototypical human ETEC H10407 strain (colonization factor antigen I; heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxin positive) and that production of heat-labile holotoxin provides a significant advantage in colonization of the small intestine in this model.

Author List

Allen KP, Randolph MM, Fleckenstein JM

Author

Kenneth Paul Allen DVM Associate Professor in the Research Office department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Animals
Bacterial Toxins
Child, Preschool
Colony Count, Microbial
Disease Models, Animal
Enterotoxins
Escherichia coli
Escherichia coli Infections
Escherichia coli Proteins
Female
Humans
Intestine, Small
Mice
Mice, Inbred ICR
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning