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Establishment of an immortalized laryngeal posterior commissure cell line as a tool for reflux research. Laryngoscope 2015 Feb;125(2):E73-7

Date

10/02/2014

Pubmed ID

25272366

DOI

10.1002/lary.24952

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-84921691276   7 Citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) has been implicated as a promoter of laryngeal cancer. Within the larynx, the posterior commissure (PC) is the region that usually comes into direct contact with refluxed materials. Specific laryngeal cell lines useful for in vitro studies are not widely available, and noncancer-derived PC laryngeal cell line has not yet been described.

STUDY DESIGN: Experimental study.

METHODS: Specimens of squamous epithelium from the PC of the larynx were collected from patients without a history or evidence of laryngeal inflammatory or neoplastic diseases. Harvested tissue was cultured and then immortalized by transduction with human papillomavirus E6/E7-encoding lentivirus. PC primary and transformed cells were characterized by light microscopy and immunohistochemistry.

RESULTS: Primary cultures established from PC contained < 5% fibroblasts and displayed normal epithelial cell morphology and cytokeratin expression. These cells survived nine passages in culture. Following lentiviral-mediated immortalization, cells retained normal squamous epithelial morphology and survived > 20 passages in culture. Methods were optimized for culture of PC laryngeal epithelial cells, resulting in 90% success rate of culture.

CONCLUSION: A novel immortalized PC laryngeal epithelial cell line has been established. This cell line provides a unique tool for investigating the mechanism of LPR in the development and progression of laryngeal cancer.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: N/A.

Author List

Lee SH, Samuels T, Bock JM, Blumin JH, Johnston N

Authors

Joel H. Blumin MD Chief, Professor in the Otolaryngology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Jonathan Bock MD Associate Professor in the Otolaryngology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Nikki Johnston PhD Associate Professor in the Otolaryngology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Cell Culture Techniques
Cell Line
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Laryngopharyngeal Reflux
Larynx
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