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Diffusion-MRI in neurodegenerative disorders. Magn Reson Imaging 2015 Sep;33(7):853-76

Date

04/29/2015

Pubmed ID

25917917

DOI

10.1016/j.mri.2015.04.006

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-84930537081   58 Citations

Abstract

The ability to image the whole brain through ever more subtle and specific methods/contrasts has come to play a key role in understanding the basis of brain abnormalities in several diseases. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), "diffusion" (i.e. the random, thermally-induced displacements of water molecules over time) represents an extraordinarily sensitive contrast mechanism, and the exquisite structural detail it affords has proven useful in a vast number of clinical as well as research applications. Since diffusion-MRI is a truly quantitative imaging technique, the indices it provides can serve as potential imaging biomarkers which could allow early detection of pathological alterations as well as tracking and possibly predicting subtle changes in follow-up examinations and clinical trials. Accordingly, diffusion-MRI has proven useful in obtaining information to better understand the microstructural changes and neurophysiological mechanisms underlying various neurodegenerative disorders. In this review article, we summarize and explore the main applications, findings, perspectives as well as challenges and future research of diffusion-MRI in various neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease and degenerative ataxias.

Author List

Goveas J, O'Dwyer L, Mascalchi M, Cosottini M, Diciotti S, De Santis S, Passamonti L, Tessa C, Toschi N, Giannelli M

Author

Joseph S. Goveas MD Professor in the Psychiatry department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Algorithms
Brain
Contrast Media
Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Humans
Image Enhancement
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and Specificity