Medical College of Wisconsin
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Oral ACTH (H.P. Acthar(A?)Gel) inhibits IL-1 and IL-17 secretion in humans. Biomed Pharmacother 2012 Feb;66(1):36-9

Date

01/17/2012

Pubmed ID

22244960

DOI

10.1016/j.biopha.2011.11.009

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-84856656063   6 Citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We have shown that oral corticotropin hormone (ACTH) decreased clinical score, inflammatory foci and T(eff) IL-17 in fed and adoptive transferred recipient mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Therefore, we determined whether oral administration of ACTH had immunological and endocrinological effects and was safe in humans.

METHODS: Three groups of three healthy adult volunteers were assayed for total serum ACTH, cortisol and a set of pro-inflammatory and counter-regulatory cytokines after ingested dose(s) of ACTH 4 IU (n=3), 41 IU (n=3), or 123 IU (n=3) over 5 days.

RESULTS: There were no safety issues during the trial. There was no increase in total ACTH levels after day 1 or day 5. There was no significant increase in total cortisol among the groups comparing day 1 to day 5. There were significant decreases in the inflammatory cytokine IL-1 and IL-17 secretion at day 6 compared to baseline with the 123 IU dose but not after the 4 IU and 41 IU doses.

CONCLUSIONS: These data provide evidence for the safety and an immunological effect of oral ACTH in humans. It is unknown if the change in IL-1 and IL-17 reflects a local GI-mediated effect or effects following systemic absorption of ACTH.

Author List

Brod SA, Bauer V, Hood Z

Author

Staley A. Brod MD Professor in the Neurology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Administration, Oral
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Gels
Hormones
Humans
Interleukin-1
Interleukin-17
Male
Prospective Studies
Time Factors