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Major anomalies and birth-weight influence NICU interventions and mortality in infants with trisomy 13 or 18. J Perinatol 2017 04;37(4):420-426

Date

01/13/2017

Pubmed ID

28079873

Pubmed Central ID

PMC5738241

DOI

10.1038/jp.2016.245

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85009348190   12 Citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To describe neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) medical interventions and NICU mortality by birth weight and major anomaly types for infants with trisomy 13 (T13) or 18 (T18).

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort analysis of infants with T13 or T18 from 2005 to 2012 in the Pediatrix Medical Group. We classified infants into three groups by associated anomaly type: neonatal surgical, non-neonatal surgical and minor. Outcomes were NICU medical interventions and mortality.

RESULTS: 841 infants were included from 186 NICUs. NICU mortality varied widely by anomaly type and birth weight, from 70% of infants <1500 g with neonatal surgical anomalies to 31% of infants ⩾2500 g with minor anomalies. Infants ⩾1500 g without a neonatal surgical anomaly comprised 66% of infants admitted to the NICU; they had the lowest rates of NICU medical interventions and NICU mortality.

CONCLUSIONS: Risk stratification by anomaly type and birth weight may help provide more accurate family counseling for infants with T13 and T18.

Author List

Acharya K, Leuthner S, Clark R, Nghiem-Rao TH, Spitzer A, Lagatta J

Authors

Krishna Kartikey Acharya MBBS Assistant Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Joanne M. Lagatta MD Associate Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Steven R. Leuthner MD Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
T Hang Nghiem-Rao MD Associate Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Birth Weight
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Male
Respiration, Artificial
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Survival Analysis
Trisomy
Trisomy 13 Syndrome
Trisomy 18 Syndrome
United States