Medical College of Wisconsin
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Person-related and treatment-related barriers to alcohol treatment. J Subst Abuse Treat 2006 Apr;30(3):261-70

Date

04/18/2006

Pubmed ID

16616171

DOI

10.1016/j.jsat.2006.01.003

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-33645963463   117 Citations

Abstract

Treatment underutilization by persons with alcohol use disorder is well-documented. This study examined barriers to treatment at the latter stages of the treatment-seeking process, which was conceptualized as recognizing the problem, deciding that change is necessary, deciding that professional help is required, and seeking care. All participants identified themselves as having a drinking problem that was severe enough to warrant treatment. Differences between those who had (Treatment Seekers) and those who had not (Comparison Controls) sought treatment were evaluated, including the experience of person-related (e.g., shame) and treatment-related (e.g., cost) barriers. Person-related barriers were more commonly endorsed by both groups than treatment-related barriers. Comparison Controls were more likely to endorse both types of barriers, especially the preference for handling the problem without treatment. Treatment-related barriers were less relevant than person-related barriers at the latter stage of help seeking. The significance of barriers endured after accounting for other differences, such as drinking-related negative consequences. Treatment implications are discussed.

Author List

Saunders SM, Zygowicz KM, D'Angelo BR

Author

Benjamin R. D'Angelo PhD Assistant Professor in the Psychiatry department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
Affective Symptoms
Alcoholism
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patients
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers