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Diagnostic Bedside Ultrasound Program Development in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Results of a National Survey. Pediatr Crit Care Med 2018 11;19(11):e561-e568

Date

08/17/2018

Pubmed ID

30113518

DOI

10.1097/PCC.0000000000001692

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85056252131   10 Citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess current diagnostic bedside ultrasound program core element (training, credentialing, image storage, documentation, and quality assurance) implementation across pediatric critical care medicine divisions in the United States.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional questionnaire-based needs assessment survey.

SETTING: Pediatric critical care medicine divisions with an Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited fellowship.

RESPONDENTS: Divisional leaders in education and/or bedside ultrasound training.

INTERVENTIONS: None.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Fifty-five of 67 pediatric critical care medicine divisions (82%) with an Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited fellowship provided responses. Overall, 63% of responding divisions (34/54) were clinically performing diagnostic bedside ultrasound studies with no difference between divisions with large versus small units. Diagnostic bedside ultrasound training is available for pediatric critical care medicine fellows within 67% of divisions (35/52) with no difference in availability between divisions with large versus small units. Other core elements were present in less than 25% of all divisions performing clinical studies, with a statistically significant increase in credentialing and documentation among divisions with large units (p = 0.048 and 0.01, respectively). All core elements were perceived to have not only high impact in program development but also high effort in implementation. Assuming that all structural elements could be effectively implemented within their division, 83% of respondents (43/52) agreed that diagnostic bedside ultrasound should be a core curricular component of fellowship education.

CONCLUSIONS: Diagnostic bedside ultrasound is increasingly prevalent in training and clinical use across the pediatric critical care medicine landscape despite frequently absent core programmatic infrastructural elements. These core elements are perceived as important to program development, regardless of division unit size. Shared standardized resources may assist in reducing the effort in core element implementation and allow us to measure important educational and clinical outcomes.

Author List

Conlon TW, Kantor DB, Su ER, Basu S, Boyer DL, Haileselassie B, Petersen TL, Su F, Nishisaki A

Author

Tara L. Petersen MD, MSED Associate Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Child
Credentialing
Critical Care
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate
Fellowships and Scholarships
Humans
Intensive Care Units, Pediatric
Pediatrics
Point-of-Care Systems
Program Development
Surveys and Questionnaires
Ultrasonography
jenkins-FCD Prod-482 91ad8a360b6da540234915ea01ff80e38bfdb40a