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Identification and characterization of the esophagoglottal closure reflex in a feline model. Am J Physiol 1994 Jan;266(1 Pt 1):G147-53

Date

01/01/1994

Pubmed ID

8304454

DOI

10.1152/ajpgi.1994.266.1.G147

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-0028009136   32 Citations

Abstract

To identify a suitable animal model and to delineate the neural pathway and target organs of the esophagoglottal closure reflex we studied three species. Study showed the existence of an esophagoglottal closure reflex in cats. The presence of this reflex could not be documented in the opossum. In monkeys, because of the inadequacy of the available recording devices, its presence could not be ascertained. In the feline model, the closure response of the vocal folds to the abrupt generalized and segmental distension of the esophagus was similar to that of the humans. Study findings indicate that among glottal adductor muscles at least interarytenoid and lateral cricoarytenoid muscles are involved as target organs of the esophagoglottal closure reflex. Decerebration did not change the frequency of glottal closure response to esophageal distension, supporting the notion that this reflex is completely under brain stem control. Bilateral cervical vagotomy abolished the glottal closure induced by esophageal distension indicating that this reflex is mediated by the vagus nerve. Upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressure response to esophageal distension by air was variable, suggesting that glottal and UES response to esophageal distension, although closely coordinated, are not dependent on one another. In summary, an esophagoglottal closure reflex exists in feline species, and many similarities in the elicitation and mediation of this reflex have been found with that of humans. This model could be used for further physiological studies.

Author List

Shaker R, Ren J, Medda B, Lang I, Cowles V, Jaradeh S

Authors

Ivan M. Lang DVM, PhD Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Reza Shaker MD Assoc Provost, Sr Assoc Dean, Ctr Dir, Chief, Prof in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Air
Animals
Catheterization
Cats
Electromyography
Endoscopy
Esophagogastric Junction
Esophagus
Female
Glottis
Humans
Injections
Macaca
Male
Opossums
Reflex
Television
jenkins-FCD Prod-399 190a069c593fb5498b7fcd942f44b7bc9cdc7ea1