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Jejunostomy. A rarely indicated procedure. Arch Surg 1986 Feb;121(2):236-8

Date

02/01/1986

Pubmed ID

3080977

DOI

10.1001/archsurg.1986.01400020122016

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-0022628346   71 Citations

Abstract

Jejunostomy is an alternative for alimentation in patients who cannot be fed orally. Seventy-three patients from the Medical College of Wisconsin Hospitals, Milwaukee, who underwent jejunostomy for gastrointestinal tract obstruction or dysfunction (28 patients), carcinoma (23 patients), neurologic disorders (13 patients), and other indications (nine patients) by the Stamm (46 patients), Witzel (17 patients), and Maydl (nine patients) techniques were studied. Forty-four patients survived and were discharged, while 29 died in the hospital. Fifty-three complications were documented among 34 patients. The jejunostomy was actually used for feeding in only 48 patients, and only 18 were discharged while receiving maintenance enterostomy feedings. Seven patients died as a direct result of complications of the jejunostomy. Jejunostomy is not an innocuous procedure; it carries a substantial risk of death and complications. Jejunostomy should be performed for alimentation only in patients with clear indications and a high potential for long-term use.

Author List

Adams MB, Seabrook GR, Quebbeman EA, Condon RE

Author

Gary R. Seabrook MD Chief, Professor in the Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Enteral Nutrition
Female
Humans
Inhalation
Jejunum
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Care
jenkins-FCD Prod-398 336d56a365602aa89dcc112f077233607d6a5abc