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Recovery of laryngeal sensation after superior laryngeal nerve anastomosis. Laryngoscope 1999 Oct;109(10):1637-41

Date

10/16/1999

Pubmed ID

10522935

DOI

10.1097/00005537-199910000-00017

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-0032867367   18 Citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Reliable motor reinnervation has been show in multiple laryngeal transplant studies; however, sensory reinnervation of the larynx after nerve anastomosis has yet to be demonstrated. The role of sensory nerve anastomosis in the transplanted larynx in unknown, but is thought to be necessary to provide airway protection. A canine model was developed to examine the possibility of reformation of sensory pathways in the larynx after nerve section and anastomosis.

STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled experiment.

METHODS: Ten canines were randomly assigned to two groups. Hydrochloric acid-induced laryngospasm was demonstrated in every dog. All dogs then had their necks explored, and the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve was identified and transected bilaterally. Following nerve section all dogs were retested for an acid-induced laryngospasm reflex. The control group had their wounds closed and were then awakened from anesthesia. The study group underwent microscopic anastomosis of their sensory nerves. Following a 6-month period the two groups of dogs were compared for the presence of the laryngospasm reflex.

RESULTS: No dog in the control group had a response to the acid. All dogs in the study group had some response to the acid, although none of them had return of true laryngospasm.

CONCLUSION: We concluded that sensory reinnervation does occur after nerve anastomosis, but the recovery of sensation may be incomplete or altered.

Author List

Blumin JH, Ye M, Berke GS, Blackwell KE

Author

Joel H. Blumin MD Chief, Professor in the Otolaryngology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Anastomosis, Surgical
Animals
Dogs
Electromyography
Laryngeal Nerves
Postoperative Period
Random Allocation
Sensation
jenkins-FCD Prod-411 e00897e83867fcfa48419861683711f8d99adb75