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Subjective global nutritional assessment in critically ill children. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr 2013 Sep;37(5):659-66 PMID: 22730117

Pubmed ID

22730117

DOI

10.1177/0148607112452000

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Underweight children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) have a higher risk of mortality than normal-weight children. The authors hypothesized that subjective global nutrition assessment (SGNA) could identify malnutrition in the PICU and predict nutrition-associated morbidities.

METHODS: The authors prospectively evaluated the nutrition status of 150 children (aged 31 days to 5 years) admitted to the PICU with the use of SGNA and commonly used objective anthropometric and laboratory measurements. Each child was administered the SGNA by a dietitian while anthropometric measurements were performed by an independent assessor. To test interrater reproducibility, 76 children had SGNA performed by another dietitian. Occurrence of nutrition-associated complications was documented for 30 days after admission.

RESULTS: SGNA ratings of well nourished, moderately malnourished, or severely malnourished demonstrated moderate to strong correlation with several standard anthropometric measurements (P < .05). The laboratory markers did not demonstrate any correlation with SGNA. Interrater agreement showed moderate reliability (κ = 0.671). Length of stay, pediatric logistic organ dysfunction, and Pediatric Risk of Mortality III were not significantly different across the groups and did not correlate with SGNA.

Author List

Vermilyea S, Slicker J, El-Chammas K, Sultan M, Dasgupta M, Hoffmann RG, Wakeham M, Goday PS

Authors

Praveen Sundaraj Goday MBBS Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Martin K. Wakeham MD Associate Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-84883523443   21 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Anthropometry
Child, Preschool
Critical Illness
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Intensive Care Units, Pediatric
Length of Stay
Male
Malnutrition
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Wisconsin
jenkins-FCD Prod-331 a335b1a6d1e9c32173c9534e6f6ff51494143916