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Moment-rotation responses of the human lumbosacral spinal column. J Biomech 2007;40(9):1975-80 PMID: 17101141

Pubmed ID

17101141

Abstract

The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the human lumbosacral joint behaves differently from L1-L5 joints and provides primary moment-rotation responses under pure moment flexion and extension and left and right lateral bending on a level-by-level basis. In addition, range of motion (ROM) and stiffness data were extracted from the moment-rotation responses. Ten T12-S1 column specimens with ages ranging from 27 to 68 years (mean: 50.6+/-13.2) were tested at a load level of 4.0 N m. Nonlinear flexion and extension and left and right lateral bending moment-rotation responses at each spinal level are reported in the form of a logarithmic function. The mean ROM was the greatest at the L5-S1 level under flexion (7.37+/-3.69 degrees) and extension (4.62+/-2.56 degrees) and at the L3-L4 level under lateral bending (4.04+/-1.11 degrees). The mean ROM was the least at the L1-L2 level under flexion (2.42+/-0.90 degrees), L2-L3 level under extension (1.58+/-0.63 degrees), and L1-L2 level under lateral bending (2.50+/-0.75 degrees). The present study proved the hypothesis that L5-S1 motions are significantly greater than L1-L5 motions under flexion and extension loadings, but the hypothesis was found to be untrue under the lateral bending mode. These experimental data are useful in the improved validation of FE models, which will increase the confidence of stress analysis and other modeling applications.

Author List

Guan Y, Yoganandan N, Moore J, Pintar FA, Zhang J, Maiman DJ, Laud P

Authors

Purushottam W. Laud PhD Professor in the Institute for Health and Equity department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Dennis J. Maiman MD, PhD Professor in the Neurosurgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Frank A. Pintar PhD Chair, Professor in the Biomedical Engineering department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Narayan Yoganandan PhD Professor in the Neurosurgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-34249799022   53 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
Aged
Biomechanical Phenomena
Humans
Lumbar Vertebrae
Lumbosacral Region
Middle Aged
Movement
Sacrum
jenkins-FCD Prod-297 dff1a717c492f00bf6291286365f1f4fe95208f1