Medical College of Wisconsin
CTSICores SearchResearch InformaticsREDCap

Rabies: Rare Human Infection - Common Questions. Infect Dis Clin North Am 2015 Dec;29(4):637-50

Date

09/20/2015

Pubmed ID

26384549

DOI

10.1016/j.idc.2015.07.006

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-84947862988   8 Citations

Abstract

Rabies is an acute, rapidly progressive encephalitis that is almost always fatal. Prophylaxis is highly effective but economics limits disease control. The mechanism of death from rabies is unclear. It is poorly cytopathic and poorly inflammatory. Rabies behaves like an acquired metabolic disorder. There may be a continuum of disease severity. History of animal bite is rare. The diagnosis is often missed. Intermittent encephalopathy, dysphagia, hydrophobia and aerophobia, and focal paresthesias or myoclonic jerks suggest rabies. Laboratory diagnosis is cumbersome but sensitive. Treatment is controversial but survivors are increasingly reported, with good outcomes in 4 of 8 survivors.

Author List

Willoughby RE Jr

Author

Rodney E. Willoughby MD Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Animals
Bites and Stings
Humans
Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis
Rabies
Rabies Vaccines
Rabies virus
Rare Diseases
jenkins-FCD Prod-399 190a069c593fb5498b7fcd942f44b7bc9cdc7ea1