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Systemic Metabolite Changes in Wild-type C57BL/6 Mice Fed Black Raspberries. Nutr Cancer 2017 Feb-Mar;69(2):299-306

Date

01/18/2017

Pubmed ID

28094560

Pubmed Central ID

PMC5644389

DOI

10.1080/01635581.2017.1263748

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85009826802   11 Citations

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Freeze-dried black raspberries (BRBs) elicit chemopreventive effects against colorectal cancer in humans and in rodents. The objective of this study was to investigate potential BRB-caused metabolite changes using wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice.

METHODS AND RESULTS: WT mice were fed either control diet or control diet supplemented with 5% BRBs for 8 wk. A nontargeted metabolomic analysis was conducted on colonic mucosa, liver, and fecal specimens collected from both diet groups. BRBs significantly changed the levels of 41 colonic mucosa metabolites, 40 liver metabolites, and 34 fecal metabolites compared to control diet-fed mice. BRBs reduced 34 lipid metabolites in colonic mucosa and increased levels of amino acids in liver. One metabolite, 3-[3-(sulfooxy) phenyl] propanoic acid, might be a useful biomarker of BRB consumption. In addition, BRB powder was found to contain 30-fold higher levels of linolenate compared to control diets. Consistently, multiple omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs), including stearidonate, docosapentaenoate (ω-3 DPA), eicosapentaenoate (EPA), and docosahexaenoate (DHA), were significantly elevated in livers of BRB-fed mice.

CONCLUSION: The data from the current study suggest that BRBs produce systemic metabolite changes in multiple tissue matrices, supporting our hypothesis that BRBs may serve as both a chemopreventive agent and a beneficial dietary supplement.

Author List

Pan P, Skaer CW, Wang HT, Kreiser MA, Stirdivant SM, Oshima K, Huang YW, Young MR, Wang LS

Authors

Yi-Wen Huang PhD Assistant Professor in the Obstetrics and Gynecology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Li-Shu Wang PhD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Amino Acids
Animals
Anticarcinogenic Agents
Benzoates
Colon
Dietary Supplements
Fatty Acids, Omega-3
Feces
Intestinal Mucosa
Lipid Metabolism
Liver
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Rubus
jenkins-FCD Prod-399 190a069c593fb5498b7fcd942f44b7bc9cdc7ea1