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The extent of lower extremity occlusive disease predicts short- and long-term patency following endovascular infrainguinal arterial intervention. Am J Surg 2008 Nov;196(5):629-33

Date

09/16/2008

Pubmed ID

18789419

DOI

10.1016/j.amjsurg.2008.07.010

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-54049087016   9 Citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Endovascular revascularization of the femoral-politeal arterial segment has gained acceptance despite lower patency than surgical bypass due to lower morbidity. Choosing patients that are ideal candidates for endovascular therapy remains controversial. We have assessed hemodynamic factors that might predict longer primary patency after endovascular therapy.

METHODS: Ninety-nine limbs were treated with endovascular therapy from January 2001 to January 2005 with a mean and median follow-up of 338 and 293 days. Primary patency was considered lost when recurrent symptoms developed, ankle-brachial index (ABI) decreased following initial improvement, or a subsequent procedure was required. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate patency.

RESULTS: Patients with an ABI > or =.5 prior to intervention had longer primary patency compared to those with an ABI less than .5 (P = .043). Having 1 or more patent tibial runoff vessels was associated with improved patency for the first 24 months post-procedure (P = .001).

CONCLUSIONS: Patients with an ABI > or =.5 or at least 1 patent tibial vessel runoff have significantly higher hemodynamic and clinical success following endovascular therapy of the femoral-popliteal arterial segment.

Author List

Hasanadka R, Brown KR, Rilling WS, Rossi PJ, Hieb RA, Hohenwalter EJ, Seabrook GR, Lewis BD, Towne JB

Authors

Kellie R. Brown MD Professor in the Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Robert A. Hieb MD Professor in the Radiology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Eric J. Hohenwalter MD Chief, Professor in the Radiology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Brian D. Lewis MD Professor in the Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
William S. Rilling MD Vice Chair, Professor in the Radiology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Peter J. Rossi MD Chief, Associate Professor in the Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Gary R. Seabrook MD Chief, Professor in the Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Aged
Angioplasty
Ankle Brachial Index
Arterial Occlusive Diseases
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Femoral Artery
Humans
Logistic Models
Lower Extremity
Male
Peripheral Vascular Diseases
Popliteal Artery
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Stents
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Patency
jenkins-FCD Prod-398 336d56a365602aa89dcc112f077233607d6a5abc