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The distal left Malone antegrade continence enema--is it better? J Urol 2013 Oct;190(4 Suppl):1529-33 PMID: 23376708

Pubmed ID

23376708

DOI

10.1016/j.juro.2013.01.092

Abstract

PURPOSE: The Malone antegrade continence enema is used for refractory fecal dysfunction in the pediatric neuropathic population. While various locations along the colon have been described, the optimal site for achieving efficient enemas remains unknown. We reviewed our experience with the Malone antegrade continence enema procedure and investigated functional outcomes and complications associated with proximal and distal locations.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed an institutional review board approved, retrospective chart review of 109 consecutive MACE procedures done by a single surgeon from 2000 to 2012. Preoperative patient characteristics, intraoperative techniques and postoperative outcomes were reviewed and statistical analysis was performed.

RESULTS: Included in analysis were 90 patients treated with a total of 109 MACE procedures. Average age at operation was 13.8 years. Myelomeningocele was the most common diagnosis. Most patients underwent simultaneous urinary reconstruction. Stomal complications were most common (49% of patients). We compared the outcomes of proximal (cecal) MACE in 48 cases and distal (sigmoid colon) MACE in 55. Location did not affect the overall efficiency of fecal continence. Flush time was shorter for distal than for proximal MACE stomas (37.2 vs 61.2 minutes, p <0.001). Of the patients 15 underwent a total of 20 complete MACE revisions, including 12 proximal and 6 distal MACEs. As a channel, appendix was associated with a higher but not statistically significant stomal complication rate compared to colon (42% vs 25%).

CONCLUSIONS: A cecal, transverse or colonic location for MACE results in acceptable outcomes. Distal MACE is associated with significantly shorter flush time and possibly fewer stomal complications. Stomal complications remain a frustrating reality of the MACE procedure.

Author List

Ellison JS, Haraway AN, Park JM

Author

Jonathan Scott Ellison MD Assistant Professor in the Urologic Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin




Scopus

2-s2.0-84883812965   8 Citations

MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adolescent
Child
Colon, Sigmoid
Colostomy
Constipation
Enema
Female
Humans
Male
Meningomyelocele
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
jenkins-FCD Prod-311 49944a3edffa738369be424e2e015ed82399648c